UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services

Perhaps you’re thinking about adding some “2.0” to your site or intranet, to obtain that great user generated content (UGC) — but where do you start?

You start with commenting, of course. No blog would be a real blog without it. And most kinds of social & collaboration software wouldn’t be considered very social (or collaborative) without the option to comment on content, either. And the best thing about commenting: how hard can it be, really? Continue reading “UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services”

photo by: mdid

Mobile Apps are Dead. Long Live the Mobile Web

It’s “Creating Headlines 101” — if you want to make an impact, you say “X is dead,” or at least ask rhetorically, “is Y an X killer?” This comes fromĀ a longstanding tradition. Most recently, Wired Magazine managed to reach the zenith with the article “The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet.” Even though that’s been discussed to death on the web (dead itself), allow me to spoof their title one last time. Just to make an entirely different point: whereas the mobile web is alive and kicking — it’s becoming nearly impossible to create mobile apps. Continue reading “Mobile Apps are Dead. Long Live the Mobile Web”

photo by: glen edelson

Do you really want a Ferrari?

I tend use cars as a metaphor to describe the differences among software products. Even in internal discussions among our team of analysts. Which is how this came up last week: I described a particular system as a Toyota compared to another vendor’s Ferrari, “never mind the fact that Ferraris are expensive and hard to keep running, they’re still in a different league.” To which one of my colleagues said, “Yes, but you’d still buy one.” Continue reading “Do you really want a Ferrari?”

photo by: exfordy

Do you need a simple or a complex CMS?

I sometimes warn that a vendor’s content management system is well suited to “simple” scenarios, but not necessarily a good fit for “more complex” cases. That’s a bit problematic: “simple” and “complex” are very subjective. So let me elaborate. Continue reading “Do you need a simple or a complex CMS?”

photo by: fdecomite

Software versions – how strange the change from major to minor

Spring is here, and, as in Autumn, this means new products released and new version numbers. But how major or minor will the releases really be? Can you tell from the versioning alone? Continue reading “Software versions – how strange the change from major to minor”

photo by: Mykl Roventine

Web standards – can’t you see?

It’s surprising to see how many major WCM implementations still suffer serious cross-browser compatibility problems. Or completely ignore accessibility standards. I like to browse the web with a multitude of browsers and devices – basically, whatever I have at hand or feel like. I don’t particularly enjoy being dictated to run Internet Explorer on a Windows PC because some company decided that’s what the majority of users will use. It annoys me – and I’m not even visually impaired. Continue reading “Web standards – can’t you see?”

photo by: menj

CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup

I suppose this must have come up before – most notably, at the inception of CM Pros (sorry – I wasn’t there). But what exactly would we define as the difference between content management and information architecture? Is CM part of IA, parallel, overlapping or something altogether different? Not to mention the further confusion that user experience (UX) is adding to the soup. Continue reading “CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup”

photo by: Nick Harris1

A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?

In his EContent column of July 2005, Bob Doyle wrote about A-Z indexes (“Your Site–from A to Z“). He suggests using such an index as a less expensive, pragmatic alternative to taxonomies and thesauri. Building and implementing classification systems takes a lot of resources while the payback for the investment is unclear. A well-done index, on the other hand, is a modest investment with clear findability benefits. Continue reading “A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?”

photo by: kvanhorn