Tagging your web content

It’s one of those elusive dreams of web content management: a completely metadata-driven publishing model. Especially when there’s lots of content, and a variety of sites or channels targeting different audiences. Wouldn’t it be great if content more or less automatically found its way to the right places? The same items appearing in all the right spots, without laboriously having to copy it or even attach it to a specific point in your website tree? Continue reading “Tagging your web content”

photo by: vonguard

Google Wave: Tsunami or Wipe Out?

Somewhat stealing the thunder of Microsoft‘s almost-released Bing search, Google presented a preview of Wave yesterday at the I/O Developer conference. So what kind of wave is this?

Well, the short version of Google’s explanation is that Wave intends to provide a modern alternative to the aging paradigm of email (the long version is on YouTube). If you’ve been following the Social Software & Collaboration space, you could recognize it as a collision of Twitter, IM, and blog comment threads. Continue reading “Google Wave: Tsunami or Wipe Out?”

photo by: ahisgett

CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup

I suppose this must have come up before – most notably, at the inception of CM Pros (sorry – I wasn’t there). But what exactly would we define as the difference between content management and information architecture? Is CM part of IA, parallel, overlapping or something altogether different? Not to mention the further confusion that user experience (UX) is adding to the soup. Continue reading “CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup”

photo by: Nick Harris1

What’s the use of Dublin Core?

While designing a new CMS implementation we wanted to really get it right. That meant outputting strict xhtml, css formatting, trying to adhere to accessibility guidelines, etcetera. Of course, the issue of metadata came up. What metadata would we render to the web pages? And in what format? Which is what got me looking at Dublin Core. Continue reading “What’s the use of Dublin Core?”

photo by: koalazymonkey

A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?

In his EContent column of July 2005, Bob Doyle wrote about A-Z indexes (“Your Site–from A to Z“). He suggests using such an index as a less expensive, pragmatic alternative to taxonomies and thesauri. Building and implementing classification systems takes a lot of resources while the payback for the investment is unclear. A well-done index, on the other hand, is a modest investment with clear findability benefits. Continue reading “A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?”

photo by: kvanhorn