UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services

Perhaps you’re thinking about adding some “2.0” to your site or intranet, to obtain that great user generated content (UGC) — but where do you start?

You start with commenting, of course. No blog would be a real blog without it. And most kinds of social & collaboration software wouldn’t be considered very social (or collaborative) without the option to comment on content, either. And the best thing about commenting: how hard can it be, really? Continue reading “UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services”

photo by: mdid

App Store? There’s an App for that

What, your system vendor doesn’t have an app store yet? Apple has popularized the concept, and most phone platforms now have something similar: Google’s Android Market and Nokia’s Ovi Store come to mind. So now everyone has to have one, not just devices, but enterprise software as well. Continue reading “App Store? There’s an App for that”

photo by: Peter Rivera

Mobile Apps are Dead. Long Live the Mobile Web

It’s “Creating Headlines 101” — if you want to make an impact, you say “X is dead,” or at least ask rhetorically, “is Y an X killer?” This comes from a longstanding tradition. Most recently, Wired Magazine managed to reach the zenith with the article “The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet.” Even though that’s been discussed to death on the web (dead itself), allow me to spoof their title one last time. Just to make an entirely different point: whereas the mobile web is alive and kicking — it’s becoming nearly impossible to create mobile apps. Continue reading “Mobile Apps are Dead. Long Live the Mobile Web”

photo by: glen edelson

Do you really want a Ferrari?

I tend use cars as a metaphor to describe the differences among software products. Even in internal discussions among our team of analysts. Which is how this came up last week: I described a particular system as a Toyota compared to another vendor’s Ferrari, “never mind the fact that Ferraris are expensive and hard to keep running, they’re still in a different league.” To which one of my colleagues said, “Yes, but you’d still buy one.” Continue reading “Do you really want a Ferrari?”

photo by: exfordy

Content is still King

Last week, I presented at Mobile Mojo — an event about Mobile & Social. It was an interesting gathering, with a lot of buzz. One of the highlights was certainly Peter Hinssen’s excellent keynote about “The New Normal” — “a concept that states we are now halfway through the digital revolution.”

His last slide argued that the old adage “content is king” is no longer true — instead, “contact is king.” That statement made a lot of sense at this conference, and was reiterated somewhat less eloquently by other attendees. If the event’s all about mobile and social, why should there still be such a focus on content management? Continue reading “Content is still King”

photo by: Ariaski

Do you need a simple or a complex CMS?

I sometimes warn that a vendor’s content management system is well suited to “simple” scenarios, but not necessarily a good fit for “more complex” cases. That’s a bit problematic: “simple” and “complex” are very subjective. So let me elaborate. Continue reading “Do you need a simple or a complex CMS?”

photo by: fdecomite

Decoding Content Management jargon

Now that we’ve built content management to reach into the clouds, have we been punished by a confusion of tongues? Sure, there are tangible differences between, say, a page-based or a component-based system. And some labels are rooted in their underlying technology. Still, there’s a couple of archetypes we could at least attempt to label similarly. But while the lingua franca of content technologies is English, vendors aren’t exactly using the same dictionaries. Continue reading “Decoding Content Management jargon”

photo by: Ryan Somma

How a volcano in Iceland disrupts online

My flight from Amsterdam to Valencia was one of the first to make it on-time, on-schedule this Tuesday — but of course, before that, I spent several days anxiously keeping track of the latest updates on the cloud hanging over Europe. And while I consider myself very lucky (a friend of mine will be stuck in Hong Kong until the 6th of May!), it gave me plenty of time to ponder just how important on-line communications play a role in this nowadays. Continue reading “How a volcano in Iceland disrupts online”

photo by: gnuckx

Measuring the 90-9-1 Rule in Social Media

You may have heard of the 90/9/1 rule of social engagement: in essence, the rule posits that in a community, 90% of the people are passive readers; 9% are active participants; and 1% account for creating the majority of content. It’s key to understanding how the growth of an online community works. Continue reading “Measuring the 90-9-1 Rule in Social Media”

photo by: daniel_iversen

Yammer not ready for the enterprise

Microblogging is the quintessential “keep it simple” service.  So when a vendor adds a seemingly minor new feature, that’s relatively big news. (Remember when Twitter added “retweets” last year?) Naturally, when Yammer announced its “community” functionality last week, it was immediately followed by a few gushy reports on what a game-changer this was. Rather than go by the demos, I waited until the service actually became available yesterday to have a look. Continue reading “Yammer not ready for the enterprise”