Coming second in a one-horse race

While writing reviews for the new Enterprise Search Report, I found myself frequently saying you should test the effectiveness of a given product against your own corpus of content, which is reiterated in the Report’s “Advice” section. But I can’t help but wonder how often an actual bake-off between vendors on a shortlist is organized. Continue reading “Coming second in a one-horse race”

photo by: Paolo Camera

Web standards – can’t you see?

It’s surprising to see how many major WCM implementations still suffer serious cross-browser compatibility problems. Or completely ignore accessibility standards. I like to browse the web with a multitude of browsers and devices – basically, whatever I have at hand or feel like. I don’t particularly enjoy being dictated to run Internet Explorer on a Windows PC because some company decided that’s what the majority of users will use. It annoys me – and I’m not even visually impaired. Continue reading “Web standards – can’t you see?”

photo by: menj

CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup

I suppose this must have come up before – most notably, at the inception of CM Pros (sorry – I wasn’t there). But what exactly would we define as the difference between content management and information architecture? Is CM part of IA, parallel, overlapping or something altogether different? Not to mention the further confusion that user experience (UX) is adding to the soup. Continue reading “CM, IA, UX and other alphabet soup”

photo by: Nick Harris1

What’s the use of Dublin Core?

While designing a new CMS implementation we wanted to really get it right. That meant outputting strict xhtml, css formatting, trying to adhere to accessibility guidelines, etcetera. Of course, the issue of metadata came up. What metadata would we render to the web pages? And in what format? Which is what got me looking at Dublin Core. Continue reading “What’s the use of Dublin Core?”

photo by: koalazymonkey

A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?

In his EContent column of July 2005, Bob Doyle wrote about A-Z indexes (“Your Site–from A to Z“). He suggests using such an index as a less expensive, pragmatic alternative to taxonomies and thesauri. Building and implementing classification systems takes a lot of resources while the payback for the investment is unclear. A well-done index, on the other hand, is a modest investment with clear findability benefits. Continue reading “A-Z Indexes: Bane or Boon?”

photo by: kvanhorn