Social Media in One or Two Words

socmedIt’s an interesting question: what is social media, anyway, to a modern professional? As a hectic work week was dwindling to an end on Thursday afternoon (Dubai work weeks are Sunday to Thursday — starting on Sunday is still weird, but starting the weekend on Thursday never gets old), I was chatting with my colleague Fouad Massoud. He’s in charge of MBC’s social media efforts (which he built from zero to an audience of millions), so he usually has some interesting points of view. As he was discussing how professional networking is transitioning from Twitter to LinkedIn, he pointed out one issue with LinkedIn: where do you find active, interesting groups? Continue reading “Social Media in One or Two Words”

How much is your audience worth?

So you’ve worked hard and you’ve now got 2 million Facebook fans for your page. Or you managed to reach 700K followers for your Twitter account. And you can show that’s 20% more than last year, so that’s totally awesome! Everybody’s happy with you. But what’s the actual value of it? Continue reading “How much is your audience worth?”

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Getting 99% more traffic

There has been a persistent myth in the back of our minds for the past two decades — the myth of increasing interactivity, and now “social” interaction. Early adopters fuel the idea that since people are social animals, they will want to constantly share everything they’re doing and thinking — often, while simultaneously doing something else. But what if most of us are, in fact, passive and somewhat introverted? What if the 99% remain silent? Continue reading “Getting 99% more traffic”

photo by: Sasha Y. Kimel

“This online stuff is too technical for me”

One of the most annoying things in digital and online, something I keep hearing, is people going “that’s too technical for me,” usually about something fairly trivial. I don’t consider myself to be a technical person, but in this space, tech comes with the territory. There’s no getting around it. Continue reading ““This online stuff is too technical for me””

photo by: richjjones

UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services

Perhaps you’re thinking about adding some “2.0” to your site or intranet, to obtain that great user generated content (UGC) — but where do you start?

You start with commenting, of course. No blog would be a real blog without it. And most kinds of social & collaboration software wouldn’t be considered very social (or collaborative) without the option to comment on content, either. And the best thing about commenting: how hard can it be, really? Continue reading “UGC, 2.0, and Commenting Services”

photo by: mdid

Content is still King

Last week, I presented at Mobile Mojo — an event about Mobile & Social. It was an interesting gathering, with a lot of buzz. One of the highlights was certainly Peter Hinssen’s excellent keynote about “The New Normal” — “a concept that states we are now halfway through the digital revolution.”

His last slide argued that the old adage “content is king” is no longer true — instead, “contact is king.” That statement made a lot of sense at this conference, and was reiterated somewhat less eloquently by other attendees. If the event’s all about mobile and social, why should there still be such a focus on content management? Continue reading “Content is still King”

photo by: Ariaski

How a volcano in Iceland disrupts online

My flight from Amsterdam to Valencia was one of the first to make it on-time, on-schedule this Tuesday — but of course, before that, I spent several days anxiously keeping track of the latest updates on the cloud hanging over Europe. And while I consider myself very lucky (a friend of mine will be stuck in Hong Kong until the 6th of May!), it gave me plenty of time to ponder just how important on-line communications play a role in this nowadays. Continue reading “How a volcano in Iceland disrupts online”

photo by: gnuckx

Measuring the 90-9-1 Rule in Social Media

You may have heard of the 90/9/1 rule of social engagement: in essence, the rule posits that in a community, 90% of the people are passive readers; 9% are active participants; and 1% account for creating the majority of content. It’s key to understanding how the growth of an online community works. Continue reading “Measuring the 90-9-1 Rule in Social Media”

photo by: daniel_iversen

The dangers of social software

Quick question. If a conference runs simultaneous tracks on “Enterprise Search,” “Document Management,” and “Company XYZ’s project to replace the intranet with microwikiblogging,” which will have the largest audience?

I’d venture a guess that most people are drawn to the the experimental and innovative, rather than to the mundane reality of complicated enterprise tools. That’s only natural, certainly at a conference. You go there to be inspired, not to be reminded of that system designed to do essential, but relatively boring stuff; a system which, on top of that, is still exhaustingly difficult to get right. Call it content technology escapism, if you will. Continue reading “The dangers of social software”

photo by: zigazou76

Users don’t know what a browser is (or anything else)

In a clip on YouTube, an interviewer asks passersby in Times Square what a browser is. The surprising result: many think it’s a search engine. Continue reading “Users don’t know what a browser is (or anything else)”

photo by: yimmy149